So in Jesus came, and the strong and the lame If the lowly beast of burden becomes a bearer of the King, then surely Christ can see through the ways our perceptions of our own worth and understanding are at times awry and distorted. James Tissot, Palm Sunday painting. At the words "rejoicing" and "shouting," the crowd began to stir. Then surely I was born. He told them to look for a donkey tied by a house, with its unbroken colt next to it. Just as the donkey is an unsung, unloved and unattractive creature who becomes the hero in Chesterton’s poem, so too the most humble and unattractive people, even though they are without social connections or the appearance of being important, are seen by Christ as who they truly are, made in God’s image and likeness. The tattered outlaw of the earth, But a famous poem illuminates the tale by embracing the perspective not of Jesus or the people, but the humble colt on which the Messiah rode. THE DONKEY. Paraphrase The theme of the poem is explaining the story of Palm Sunday that most important man to ever walk the Earth used the most unattractive animal to take him into town. Patrick Comerford's 2012 Series "Poems for Easter", Good Friday Hymns #4: In Evil Long I Took Delight (John Newton) / The Look (adaptation by Bob Kauflin), Lent Prayers: Martin Luther - You are my righteousness, I am your sin, A Poem for Good Friday - Amy Carmichael: Lest We Forget, Lenten reflections by Christian Leaders: Rowan Williams & Pope Benedict XVI, * Advent Category (all Advent posts on the blog), *Index of all L&B Advent Entries (2004 – 2006), Christian Resource Institute – Advent page, Holy Trinity New Rochelle – Advent Resources, Jesse Tree Devotions (Older youth / adults), Lift Up Your Hearts (Advent, Christmas, Epiphany Links). Save us." In this short poem G. K. Chesterton captures Palm Sunday from the perspective of the donkey that Jesus rode. When fishes flew and forests walked. He truly is, Gods righteous Son, He’d come to that place to show God’s saving grace, that God’s on the sufferer’s side. . All humanity is graced to be made in the image of God, and like Balaam's Ass in the Old Testament, its often through rejected, unexpected outsiders that God chooses to speak his wisdom. The Rev. The renowned author, journalist and Christian apologist GK Chesterton was the inspired […] Why does China feel so threatened by Christians? The renowned author, journalist and Christian apologist GK Chesterton was the inspired mind behind a short poem that puts a new spin on Palm Sunday. The story in this case grasps the easily forgotten absurdity of Palm Sunday: a prophesied King of Israel entered Jerusalem not on a throne or with an army at his side, but on a donkey. The poem's final stanza gives us the revelation of this lowly animal's secret past: 'Fools! Post was not sent - check your email addresses! When fishes flew and forests walked And figs grew upon thorn, Some moment when the moon was blood, Then surely I was born; ... Aries - I have always loved this poem, since i first read it at school.Really thought provoking, wonderful . The Donkey: How GK Chesterton radically retold Palm Sunday. In a society still so susceptible to surface-level judgements, confusing image and integrity, it's a timely warning from Chesterton. His  writing would later inspire the atheist CS Lewis to convert. Before Jesus entered the city, he told his disciples, “go into the village in front of you, and immediately you will find a donkey tied, and a colt with her. the donkey waited. For I also had my hour; One far fierce hour and sweet: There was a shout about my ears, And palms before my feet. "Son of David!" Please click here to learn how. Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email. A tender poem that references Palm Sunday. . Transfigurations blog – Advent Devotionals, Becoming Easter People (Ordinary Splendor blog), Daily Prayers & Reflections for the Easter Octave (Creighton U. For him, theology and imagination were intimately connected. The highest One has deigned to become one of us, to call us brothers and sisters, indeed, to call us friends. The Donkey, by GK Chesterton. Some moment when the moon was blood. the donkey. Was you ever in Miramichi, Where ye tie up to a tree, An' the girls sit on yer knee, Ridin' on a donkey? With monstrous head and sickening cry, You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. Imagine perhaps that you are the donkey. Way hey and away we go, Donkey riding, donkey riding; Way hey and away we go, Ridin' on a donkey. This is a poem that I wrote and preached as the Palm/Passion Sunday sermon this past weekend at the Upper Room. Chesterton’s poem The Donkey is a classic of reversed perspectives – ‘unexpected prophecy in the mouth of a donkey … highly suitable for celebrating Palm Sunday, the festival of the king who rides humbly on an ass, rather than on a war horse like the Roman conquerors’ as Janet Morely puts it in her excellent book, The Heart’s Time – a series of mediations on various poems for Lent and Easter. Is the donkey too hard on himself? With monstrous head and sickening cry. The donkey may be derided as a stupid animal, yet he is used by God for the most triumphal journey in history, highlighting the difference between God’s wisdom and ours. on May 26 2009 11:47 PM x edit . There's a wider point not just about Easter but human life: we're invited to see in the lowly and unimpressive glimpses of glory and supreme dignity. Change ), You are commenting using your Google account. Palm Sunday by Albert Watson. For I also had my hour; The Rev. But with the mention of the word "King," a call went up that was to be a constant cry for the rest of this strange procession: "Hosanna! ‘The Donkey’ by G.K. Chesterton is told from the perspective of the self-hating donkey Christ rode into Jerusalem on Palm Sunday. ( Log Out /  As the world changes at breakneck speed, can the Church keep up? The Donkey. The tattered outlaw of the earth, Of ancient crooked will; Starve, scourge, deride me: I am dumb, I keep my secret still. What kind of king rides on a donkey a donkey that might be borrowed, or might be hijacked? Way hey and away we go, Donkey riding, donkey riding; Way hey and away we go, Ridin' on a donkey. And palms before my feet. When fishes flew and forests walked, 4 tried and tested ways to slow down and reflect, Racial discrimination 'has no place' in evangelicalism, Big Tech may soon ban Christians, church leader warns. And ears like errant wings, Change ), You are commenting using your Facebook account. Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com. This animal, easily cast aside, has hosted majesty like no other creature has. Son of David! Admin April 14, 2019 April 14, 2019 Other Writers. They didn’t know the half of it. "Hosanna!" Palm Sunday celebrates Christ's triumphant entry into Jerusalem, riding on a donkey with palms at his feet. With monstrous head and sickening cry And ears like errant wings, The devil's walking parody On all four-footed things. But a famous poem illuminates the tale by embracing the perspective not of Jesus or the people, but the humble colt on which the Messiah rode. Five days later, Jesus broke bread with his disciples and told them, “This is my body.” Some moment when the moon was blood, went up the shout. the donkey waited. The Donkey -a poem by G.K. Chesterton WHEN fishes flew and forests walked And figs grew upon thorn, Some moment when … The renowned author, journalist and Christian apologist GK Chesterton was the … Zechariah's word, today comes true, 'See your King now comes to you.' Patrick Comerford has posted GK Chesterton’s poem “The Donkey” as his Palm Sunday entry in his Lenten Poems series. The poem is about palm Sunday told from the Donkey's point of In the first lines of this piece, the speaker begins by stating that as he was born he was made into something ugly. The Poet thinks about the donkey. Palm Sunday is a day we Christians commemorate as we remember Jesus’ triumphal entry into Jerusalem during this Easter season. Change ), You are commenting using your Twitter account. Palm Sunday - The Donkey Poem - G. K. Chesterton. A number of people have requested copies of it, so I’m making it available here. The devil’s walking parody But then, most us may be too hard on ourselves. by G.K. Chesterton. Fools! Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in: You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. The reverence this animal has for its Messianic rider challenges the audience: they're encouraged to recover the immense wonder in the familiar biblical scene. Spread your cloak, grab a palm, Let's all rejoice and sing a psalm. When fishes flew and forests walked And figs grew upon thorn, Some moment when the moon was blood Then surely I was born; With monstrous head and sickening cry And ears like errant wings, The devil's walking parody On all four-footed things. The Donkey poem is one of the most popular posts on Ichabod, The Glory Has Departed. This is the best Palm Sunday poem we know. It … But a famous poem illuminates the tale by embracing the perspective not of Jesus or the people, but the humble colt on which the Messiah rode. Cry blessing to you Saviour King, Shout aloud, hosanna's ring. One far fierce hours and sweet: Was you ever in Fortune Bay? As you ponder this poem, place yourself in the scene. G. K. Chesterton wrote a beautiful poem about a mournful donkey, and only mentions Palm Sunday in passing, without naming the day. Palm Sunday marks the occasion when Jesus “set his face to go to Jerusalem” (Luke 9:51) for the last time and rode into the city seated on a donkey amid the welcome and cheers of the crowd. But a famous poem illuminates the tale by embracing the perspective not of Jesus or the people, but the humble colt on which the Messiah rode. […] A Poem for Palm Sunday: GK Chesterton’s “The Donkey” […], […] A Poem for Palm Sunday: GK Chesterton’s “The Donkey” (2012) […]. ), Our compilation of Easter Resources & Links, Practice Resurrection (Ordinary Splendor blog), 2006 Anglican Bloggers Lenten Devotionals Series – Index, Biola: The Lent Project (online multi-media devotional), Homemaking Through the Church Year (Lent), Jouney to the Cross Devotional (D365.org), Lenten Scripture Cross – a Lenten “Jesse Tree”, Passionists: Meditations & Prayers for Lent, Trinity School for Ministry: Online Lenten Devotional, Magic Statistics (Prayers & Liturgy posts), Middle East & North Africa (Lent & Beyond), The King’s English – Reborn as Reading Between The Lines. Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window), Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window), Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window), Holy Week 2012 Index of Posts « Lent & Beyond, A Collection of Palm Sunday Prayers and Devotionals | Lent & Beyond, Poems for Lent, Holy Week, Good Friday… | Lent & Beyond, 43 Poems for Lent - a complete index of Patrick Comerford's 2012 blog series, A Compilation of 70 Favorite Easter and Eastertide Hymns, A Poem for Palm Sunday: GK Chesterton's "The Donkey", Music for Lent: Not What My Hands Have Done, The Rev. “What can we possibly learn from the donkey?” Well, God once used a donkey to speak to someone in the Old Testament. And this witness too can provide us with a valuable perspective on that first Palm Sunday. Works Cited Its pretty self-explaining. gentle and riding on a donkey, on a colt, the foal of a donkey." You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site. ( Log Out /  Fools! Christ rode him into Jerusalem on Palm Sunday, and that one moment gives the donkey confidence in himself. Instead, his experience is an internal knowledge of his true value. I’ve really appreciated the Rev. Sorry, your blog cannot share posts by email. Comerford’s Lenten poetry series this Lent and encourage you to browse through some of the wonderful poems and reflections. Fools! By David Mills Published on March 29, 2015 • David Mills. What does it feel like? Home‎ > ‎Quotations and Illustrations‎ > ‎~P‎ > ‎Palm Sunday‎ > ‎ Poem, "The Poet Thinks of the Donkey" The Poet Thinks of the Donkey, by Mary Oliver. clatter away, splashed with sunlight. But the Christ Child also rode on a donkey when he was carried in the womb by his mother, the Virgin Mary, to Bethlehem before his birth. VIDEO : 1 min Read by Dame Edith Evans, 1939 They don’t read poetry like this nowadays. On this day, 1 April, it might be too easy to think of the donkey as foolish. It is a 'tattered outlaw' to be starved and derided, but though it cannot speak, this outcast animal has seen wondrous things. leap with delight! Ridin' on a donkey? Nobody is truly worthless, no matter what others may think. And figs grew upon thorn. Then he let himself be led away. Palm Sunday celebrates Christ’s triumphant entry into Jerusalem, riding on a donkey with palms at his feet. And ears like errant wings. For I also had my hour; One far fierce hour and sweet: There was a shout about my ears, And palms before my feet. My Poem for Lent today on this Palm Sunday morning is ‘The Donkey’ by Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), an English writer, journalist, critic and poet who was well-known for his reasoned apologetics. a young donkey on which he could ride. The Donkey . Of ancient crooked will; Starve, scourge, deride me: I am dumb, I keep my secret still. In God’s eyes, we all deserve palms before our feet. To enjoy our website, you'll need to enable JavaScript in your web browser. But the donkey, tied to a tree as usual, waited. It's God – not human judgments – who gives creatures their glorious dignity.eval(ez_write_tag([[580,400],'christiantoday_com-medrectangle-4','ezslot_2',150,'0','0'])); Stay up to date with the latest Christian news! What kind of king are you? I guess he can use a donkey to speak to us today if he wants. The Donkey - A poem by G.K. Chesterton WHEN fishes flew and forests walked And figs grew upon thorn, Some moment when the moon was blood Then surely I was born. The Donkey. For I also had my hour;eval(ez_write_tag([[300,250],'christiantoday_com-medrectangle-3','ezslot_1',156,'0','0'])); One far fierce hour and sweet: There was a shout about my ears, And palms before my feet.'. ( Log Out /  TeachingMom.Com Advent Calendar – Excellent! “The donkey?” you say. Then surely I was born. This entry was posted on Sunday, April 1st, 2012 at 5:56 pm and is filed under Anglican Heritage, Devotional, Holy Week, Lent Devotionals, Palm Sunday, Poems, Hymns and Songs. When fishes flew and forests walked, And figs grew upon thorn, Some moment when the moon was blood, Then surely I was born. Praise the Lord, call out with glee, Your Saviour comes astride donkey. For I also had my hour; One far fierce hour and sweet: There was a shout about my ears, And palms before my feet. Loving and meek, no power would he seek, as he sat on the donkey so humble. Then he let the stranger mount. When it is untied and let go, nothing can stop the love of God and neighbor that is inside of us. Chesterton captures Palm Sunday from the perspective of the donkey that Jesus rode. Christ looked even more “monstrous” than the donkey (Isaiah 52: 14), he was “starved, scourged, derided,” four times in the Gospels he was “dumb,” but his hour of glory came on the cross. Of ancient, crooked will; Also a wonderful metaphor for how God uses the flawed to complete his perfect will. Lessons from a Donkey By AlAn R. Rudnick What needs to be untied in our lives, so that we can praise and honor God? With monstrous head and sickening cry, And figs grew upon thorn, The tattered outlaw of the earth, Of ancient crooked will; Starve, scourge, deride me: I am dumb, I keep my secret still. You have to be familiar with the story of Jesus entering Jerusalem on the back of a donkey to catch the allusion. A poem for Palm Sunday – “The Donkey”, G K Chesterton by Séamus Sweeney Posted on April 14, 2019 I find Chesterton a somewhat mixed bag , and that applies to his poetry also, but this has always moved me deeply, and is all the more effective for concealing its theme until the last stanza: On the outskirts of Jerusalem. At the end of the third stanza, the donkey informs us that he has a secret, and that secret is revealed in the last two lines of the poem. I keep my secret still. 1. The Donkey: A Poem for Palm Sunday. Patrick Comerford has posted GK Chesterton’s poem “The Donkey” as his Palm Sunday entry in his Lenten Poems series. No matter how humble or crushed in spirit we may feel, we are all God’s beloved children and we are all capable of being raised in glory. Palm Sunday: ‘The Donkey’ by G.K. Chesterton G. K. Chesterton tells the story from the donkey's point of view. Soon enough on that road he’d be bearing a load: a cross that would cause him to stumble. An unimpressive creature, its 'monstrous head...sickening cry and ears like errant wings' render it 'the devil's walking parody'. The donkey remains dumb and does not declare his moment of greatness to those who deride him. The whole poem is written with the donkey … There was a shout about my ears, ( Log Out /  Starve, scourge, deride me: I am dumb, Still, perhaps some others in that Palm Sunday crowd saw the donkey and thought of the humble king. Change ). DAVID MILLS — Following is the English writer G. K. Chesterton’s poem, “The Donkey.” Palm Sunday Story Summary On his way to Jerusalem, Jesus sent two disciples ahead to the village of Bethphage, about a mile away from the city at the foot of the Mount of Olives. In 2016, it is observed in the Western church on March 20, while in … Maybe they started dreaming of the grain and wine he would provide for them. Palm Sunday is the day when we, like Jesus’ animal companion, are set loose to … The One who carries the world in the palm of his hand allowed a donkey to carry him, and endured those waving palms in the hands of those … The image of the donkey in his moment of glory carrying Christ speaks of the intrinsic worth of every human, and the glory of every human soul in God’s love. The Bishop of London on how Christians can stay anchored in the chaos of Covid-19, Evangelical support for Trump remained strong even after attack on Capitol, Lord Carey can minister again as Permission to Officiate is reinstated, Megachurch pastor Ed Young mourns death of daughter aged 34. Titled simply 'The Donkey', it narrates, in the voice of the colt, its sad existence. GK Chesterton, a Catholic, explored theological and existential truths through fiction and poetry. THE TRIUMPHAL ENTRY OF JESUS CHRIST INTO JERUSALEM. The tattered outlaw of the earth, Of ancient crooked will, he stood and waited. Of all four-footed things. I am talking about . Palm Sunday celebrates Christ's triumphant entry into Jerusalem, riding on a donkey with palms at his feet. Registered in England and Wales 5090917, Christian Today, International House, 24 Holborn Viaduct, London EC1A 2BN, Enough of presidents who speak the language of Christianity while leaving out Christ, 'Spiritual' but non-religious Gen Z are lonely and craving relationships, study shows, Bill seeks to protect freedom of speech at university from cancel culture. eval(ez_write_tag([[728,90],'christiantoday_com-box-3','ezslot_4',113,'0','0'])); Palm Sunday celebrates Christ's triumphant entry into Jerusalem, riding on a donkey with palms at his feet. As he wrote in Orthodoxy: 'I had always felt life first as a story: and if there is a story there is a story-teller.' However, this poem points us, not so much to the donkey, but to our “Beast of Burden,” Christ, who carried the burden that no one else could bear – the sins of the world. Chesterton was an English poet, art critic and Christian apologist. Here is a further portion of the full blog entry with a reflection on the poem: The donkey serves as literary device to link birth and death, Christmas and Easter, We often think of the donkey as the lowly, humble, unattractive beast of burden who carries Christ into Jerusalem on Palm Sunday. Fools! Jesus entering Jerusalem on Palm Sunday - the donkey confidence in himself posted GK Chesterton, a Catholic explored. Truths through fiction and poetry your email address to subscribe to this blog receive... “ the donkey poem is one of us, to call us brothers and sisters, indeed, to us... Warning from Chesterton by Dame Edith Evans, 1939 they don ’ t the! Not share posts by email comes astride donkey. Dame Edith Evans, 1939 they ’. Susceptible to surface-level judgements, confusing image and integrity, it 's a timely warning from.!, your blog can not share posts by email to call us friends and meek, no would... Today if he wants like this nowadays 2019 Other Writers all deserve palms before our.. Google account 2015 • David Mills Published on March 29, 2015 • David Published! All four-footed things by a house, with its unbroken colt next to it people have requested copies it... Be familiar with the story of Jesus entering Jerusalem on the donkey Jesus! On a colt, the speaker begins by stating that as he was born he was made into something.. Entry through the RSS 2.0 feed donkey ’ by G.K. Chesterton is from. This is the best Palm Sunday to those who deride him `` rejoicing '' and ``,. Society still so susceptible to surface-level judgements, confusing image and integrity, it 's a timely warning from.!, its sad existence the crowd began to stir his true value journalist Christian... Road he ’ d be bearing a load: a cross that cause... Poems series society still so susceptible to surface-level judgements, confusing image and integrity, it narrates, in voice! Theological and existential truths through fiction and poetry, theology and imagination were intimately connected sorry, blog... The best Palm Sunday from the perspective of the humble King stanza gives us the revelation of this piece the. Truths through fiction and poetry the devil 's walking parody of all four-footed things commenting using your Facebook.. God and neighbor that is inside of us, to call us friends, Out! T know the half of it the crowd began to stir commenting using your Google account you have be! Comerford has posted GK Chesterton, a Catholic, explored theological and existential truths through fiction and.. In: you are commenting using your Facebook account ( Log Out / Change ), you are commenting your! Commenting using your Twitter account to Log in: you are commenting using your Twitter account on that he... A load: a cross that would cause him to stumble like errant wings, donkey! Leave a response, or trackback from your own site Christ 's triumphant into... 2019 Other Writers own site simply 'The donkey ', it might be too easy think. King rides on a colt, its 'monstrous head... sickening cry and ears like errant '... Your email addresses donkey so humble render it 'The devil 's walking of! Share posts by email instead, his experience is an internal knowledge of his true value as usual waited. Donkey Christ rode him into Jerusalem on Palm Sunday donkey ', it narrates, in first... 2019 Other Writers, as he was made into something ugly Jesus rode deride him cause! Check your email addresses creature, its 'monstrous head... sickening cry, the foal of a donkey tied! Know the half of it poem, place yourself in the voice of the donkey ’ by G.K. Chesterton told! Internal knowledge of his true value Jesus entering Jerusalem on the donkey that rode! Entry into Jerusalem, riding on a colt, its sad existence Jesus entering Jerusalem on Palm celebrates... Kind of King rides on a donkey a donkey to catch the allusion at breakneck,. Would cause him to stumble trackback from your own site has hosted majesty no. Saviour comes astride donkey. thought of the humble King t know the half it. Cloak, grab a Palm, let 's all rejoice and sing a psalm what of! Poetry series this Lent and encourage you to browse through some of the most popular on. Comerford has posted GK Chesterton radically retold Palm Sunday as he was born he was he... Donkey, tied to a tree as usual, waited wonderful Poems and reflections imagination... Today if he wants 2019 April 14, 2019 April 14, 2019 April 14, April... Aloud, hosanna 's ring, today comes true, 'See your King now to!